rearrange your DNA? what chorus frogs can do…

February 9. It’s a chorus frog extravaganza beyond any we remember. Rain early and often has filled the vernal pools so the frogs know they have the time needed for production of the next generation. Every night they sing together in celebration – party, worship, call for mates, whatever you call it, the sound penetrates the thick straw walls and closed double windows like a high-pitched tribal drumbeat. Open the door and it’s a wall of sound, solid and insistent and loud even though the big pond is a hundred yards away. Walk out into the dark and the sound engulfs you, echoes inside your cells, rearranges your DNA. Or something like that, some radical wild nature atunement.I’m experiencing the wrap-around frog chorale several times a week when I can come home for a respite from elder duty. Yes, it’s the winter season of elders passing. Aunt Jean on November 28, and now I’m staying with 96-year-old step-dad Bill as he approaches the end of his time here with good humor, boundless curiosity, and a willingness to share his experience as it unfolds. This may explain the hiatus in farm news. Plus, at the turn of the year I moved from the strawbale cabin Lin and I built into the older house at the other side of the property. Another pond, smaller than the back pasture main stage but big enough for a damn good show, lies close to this house. On my occasional nights in Laytonville I can hear the chorus all night at soothing lullaby decibel levels.

(This post actually written January 17, which I mention for anyone who may be interested in the finer details of chorus frog life. That was the peak of the season. The nightly songfest is still the main attraction, but it’s no longer so overwhelming.)